IELTS Listening Practice 103

 
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Questions 21-26

Complete the notes below.  

Write NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

Ethical fashion:

*Definition: describes design, production, retail, and .

* Covers issues such as: working conditions, exploitation, fair trade, sustainable production, the environment, and .

* Globalisation = materials &   are low cost.

* Industrialised methods = fabrics can be made .and in large quantities.

* Customers can buy high street fashion at and they feel it is .

Questions 27-29

Choose the correct letter, A, B, or C.

Write your answers in boxes 27-29 on your answer sheet.

27 Pam say that the issue with labour conditions is that

28 Pam says that producing textiles

29 According to Pam, cheap clothes are

 
This listening practice simulates the third section of the IELTS Listening test. Listen to the audio and answer questions 21-29.

  • library_books Audio Script

    (Section 3: You will hear a conversation between a tutor and a student who has recently been doing research on ethical fashion. First, you will have some time to look at questions 21 to 29 [20 seconds]. Listen carefully and answer questions 21 to 29.)

    T=Tutor

    P=Pam

    T: Right, now Pam, you’ve been looking at ethical fashion, and some of the issues affecting this trend. How is your research going?

    P: It’s going well. I’ve found a lot of information.

    T: Excellent. Can you start by giving us a summary. Perhaps you can start with a definition.

    P: Of course. Well, Ethical Fashion is an umbrella term to describe ethical fashion design, production, retail, and purchasing. It covers a range of issues such as working conditions, exploitation, fair trade, sustainable production, the environment, and animal welfare.

    T: Why do you think it’s needed?

    P: The high street clothing industry accounts for a massive share of Western retail. Every year, 100 million shoppers visit London's Oxford Street alone. Globalisation means that materials and labour can be purchased in different parts of the world where costs are very low. Also, industrialised methods of growing cotton mean that fabrics can be produced quickly and cheaply, and in very large quantities. These savings are passed on to the customer, meaning that high street fashion is available at increasingly low prices, and much of it is regarded as disposable.

    T: Right. And I support that those who favour Ethical Fashion would argue that all this has a cost that we are not able to see on the price tag.

    T: What are some of the issues around Ethical Fashion?

    P: Well, Ethical Fashion aims to address the problems it sees with the way the fashion industry currently operates, such as exploitative labour, environmental damage, the use of hazardous chemicals, waste, and animal cruelty.

    T: Tell us more about labour conditions.

    P: Ok. Serious concerns are often raised about exploitative working conditions in the factories that make cheap clothes for the high street. Child workers, alongside exploited adults, can be subjected to violence and abuse such as forced overtime, as well as cramped and unhygienic surroundings, bad food, and very poor pay. The low cost of clothes on the high street means that less and less money goes to the people who actually make them.

    T: Hmm. And what is the issue with environmental damage?

    P: Cotton provides much of the world's fabric, but growing it uses 22.5% of the world's insecticides and 10% of the world's pesticides, chemicals which can be dangerous for the environment and harmful to the farmers who grow it. Current textile growing practices are considered unsustainable because of the damage they do to the immediate environment. For example, the Aral Sea in Central Asia has shrunk to just 15% of its former volume, largely due to the vast quantity of water required for cotton production and dying. Most textiles are treated with chemicals to soften and dye them, however these chemicals can be toxic to the environment and can be transferred to the skin of the people wearing them.

    T: One of the major problems, of course, is that the low costs and disposable nature of high street fashion means that much of it is destined for incinerators or landfill sites.

    P: Absolutely. The UK alone throws away 1 million tonnes of clothing every year. Some is recycled or reused in some way but the majority is not. Not only that but many animals are farmed to supply fur for the fashion industry, and many people feel that their welfare is an important part of the Ethical Fashion debate. Many designers now refuse to use either fur or leather in their designs.

    T: I see. Thank you, Pam. Now, what about you, Paul. What have you found out about ethical fashion? …

Answer Sheet
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2
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11
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13
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24
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25
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27
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29
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30
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40
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Listening Script Vocabulary

(Section 3: You will hear a conversation between a tutor and a student who has recently been doing research on ethical fashion. First, you will have some time to look at questions 21 to 29 [20 seconds]. Listen carefully and answer questions 21 to 29.)

T=Tutor

P=Pam

T: Right, now Pam, you’ve been looking at ethical fashion, and some of the issues affecting this trend. How is your research going?

P: It’s going well. I’ve found a lot of information.

T: Excellent. Can you start by giving us a summary. Perhaps you can start with a definition.

P: Of course. Well, Ethical Fashion is an umbrella term to describe ethical fashion design, production, retail, and purchasing. It covers a range of issues such as working conditions, exploitation, fair trade, sustainable production, the environment, and animal welfare.

T: Why do you think it’s needed?

P: The high street clothing industry accounts for a massive share of Western retail. Every year, 100 million shoppers visit London's Oxford Street alone. Globalisation means that materials and labour can be purchased in different parts of the world where costs are very low. Also, industrialised methods of growing cotton mean that fabrics can be produced quickly and cheaply, and in very large quantities. These savings are passed on to the customer, meaning that high street fashion is available at increasingly low prices, and much of it is regarded as disposable.

T: Right. And I support that those who favour Ethical Fashion would argue that all this has a cost that we are not able to see on the price tag.

T: What are some of the issues around Ethical Fashion?

P: Well, Ethical Fashion aims to address the problems it sees with the way the fashion industry currently operates, such as exploitative labour, environmental damage, the use of hazardous chemicals, waste, and animal cruelty.

T: Tell us more about labour conditions.

P: Ok. Serious concerns are often raised about exploitative working conditions in the factories that make cheap clothes for the high street. Child workers, alongside exploited adults, can be subjected to violence and abuse such as forced overtime, as well as cramped and unhygienic surroundings, bad food, and very poor pay. The low cost of clothes on the high street means that less and less money goes to the people who actually make them.

T: Hmm. And what is the issue with environmental damage?

P: Cotton provides much of the world's fabric, but growing it uses 22.5% of the world's insecticides and 10% of the world's pesticides, chemicals which can be dangerous for the environment and harmful to the farmers who grow it. Current textile growing practices are considered unsustainable because of the damage they do to the immediate environment. For example, the Aral Sea in Central Asia has shrunk to just 15% of its former volume, largely due to the vast quantity of water required for cotton production and dying. Most textiles are treated with chemicals to soften and dye them, however these chemicals can be toxic to the environment and can be transferred to the skin of the people wearing them.

T: One of the major problems, of course, is that the low costs and disposable nature of high street fashion means that much of it is destined for incinerators or landfill sites.

P: Absolutely. The UK alone throws away 1 million tonnes of clothing every year. Some is recycled or reused in some way but the majority is not. Not only that but many animals are farmed to supply fur for the fashion industry, and many people feel that their welfare is an important part of the Ethical Fashion debate. Many designers now refuse to use either fur or leather in their designs.

T: I see. Thank you, Pam. Now, what about you, Paul. What have you found out about ethical fashion? …

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