IELTS Academic Reading Practice 49

 
schedule First Time: 0 min 0 secs
replay Retake Test
  • Your Score: /
schedule20:00
This reading practice simulates one part of the IELTS Academic Reading test. You should spend about twenty minutes on it. Read the passage and answer questions 1-14.

Questions 1-9

Look at the following Descriptions (Questions 1-9) and List of categories below.

Match each category with the correct description.

Write the correct number A-J in boxes Questions 1-9 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

List of categories
  1. Cockatoos
  2. Cacatuidae
  3. Psittacidae
  4. Loriinae
  5. Ground Parrots
  6. Rock Parrots
  7. Mulga Parrots
  8. Galahs
  9. Lorikeets
  10. Cockatiels

1. endemic to arid shrublands
2. communicate with members of their species
3. specialize in eating flower nectar
4. migrate from place to place
5. dune areas are the preferred habitats
6. have a special structure located on the end of their tongue
7. one of the most popular birds to keep as pets
8. do not have a specific habitat
9. one of three families of true parrots
Questions 10-12

Choose three letters A-F.

Write your answers in boxes 10-12 on your answer sheet.

Which TWO of the following are stated about Australian parrots?
  1. Most of them are non-nonctural
  2. A few types of them exhibit camouflage.
  3. They mostly feed on seeds
  4. They often need to compete for food
  5. Most of them are solitary eaters
  6. Some of them are carnivores

10
11
12
Questions 13-14

Choose the correct letter, A, B, C or D.

Write your answers in boxes 13-14 on your answer sheet.

13 How have most parrots adapted especially to eat seeds?

14 What do parrots usually do after they eat their first “meal” of the day?


Answer Sheet
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
N/A
16
N/A
17
N/A
18
N/A
19
N/A
20
N/A
21
N/A
22
N/A
23
N/A
24
N/A
25
N/A
26
N/A
27
N/A
28
N/A
29
N/A
30
N/A
31
N/A
32
N/A
33
N/A
34
N/A
35
N/A
36
N/A
37
N/A
38
N/A
39
N/A
40
N/A


  • help Learn how to HIGHLIGHT & ADD NOTES
    1. HOLD LEFT CLICK
    2. DRAG MOUSE OVER TEXT
    3. RIGHT CLICK SELECTED TEXT

Parrots

Parrots are an enormously diverse group of birds with over 330 species in total, and just 56 in Australia alone. Portuguese sailing expeditions once reported such a large quantity of birds that when mapmakers of the 14th century described the southern coast of Australia, they called it  Psittacorum Regio, or, “The Region of Parrots.” Parrots of Australia can be further split into three families, all stemming from the Psittaciformes order. Cockatoos, members of the Cacatuidae family, are genetically distinct from other parrots, as well as being the largest. They are described as having a solid build, strong moveable claws, and distinct, also moveable crests. However, most parrots native to Australia (up to 60% of Australia’s species) are part of the Psittacidae family, or “true parrot” family. Lastly, the Loriinae subfamily, including the well-known Lorikeets, are biologically different in ways that separate them from their other parrot relatives.

The way a parrot’s foot appears is unique to these birds, with the “zygodactylous” positioning of two of their toes pointing forwards and two pointing backwards. This gives parrots the ability to move skillfully through the trees using their feet, and all of their toes also end in long, sharply curved claws, allowing for an even stronger grip on tree trunks and slippery nuts or seed pods. The Psittaciformes order is the only group of birds known to have this particular beak and toe arrangement. Similarly to other birds, a protein called keratin are what forms a parrot’s feathers; it’s the same material that makes up our hair and nails.

The majority of parrots eat by tearing seed pods, pine cones and nuts apart, as they are specialized seed-eaters. They are also seen eating grass seeds and young shoots, and some species, especially lorikeets, also feed on nectar and pollen. The lorikeet’s  tongue structure has evolved to have a long papillae forming a brush-like texture in order to absorb as much of it as possible. Strong bills with a deep curve are a feature which define parrots as a bird species. Their upper mandible moves around, as the lower mandible sits almost unmoving inside the closed bill, which allows parrots to open seeds in their mouths with the help of their claws and tongues. Even though parrots are mostly herbivores, some also snack on insects and their larvae found under tree bark. Fruits like bananas, rainforest fruit and native figs are favorites for subtropical and tropical species. Seedeaters don’t have to compete for food much, as species of seed-bearing plants usually produce seeds simultaneously during the year. So, usually a whole flock of parrots searching for seeds together can find enough to eat. A flock’s social structure is especially advantageous for the cockatoos, who use a “watch bird” stationed in a nearby tree to keep an eye on the other birds as they feed, and signal them about any potential danger.

Parrot species native to Australia have spread across the continent. They can be found on the coasts, as well as dry grassy inland areas, and seem to thrive in all kinds of habitats. The Rock Parrot particularly likes the harsh saline dunes. Even though their feathers usually have brightly colored plumage, most species stay well-camouflaged, and only a quick flash of color under their wings would suggest anything otherwise. The Ground Parrot and the Night Parrot are the only two species who evolved to live anywhere on land. Other species prefer specific habitats. For example, the Mulga Parrot likes to live in arid and semi-arid woodlands or shrublands. Some rainforest species of parrot are the huge Palm Cockatoo and the sexually dimorphic, yet brightly colored Eclectus Parrot. Parrots do not often migrate, yet there are a few which will seek out specific flowering plants that they also help pollinate. For instance, the Galah, which can be found across the entire mainland as well as the island of Tasmania, is likely the most widespread type, while the commonly seen Rosellas are found in genetically distinct varieties in each Australian State.

Routines for parrots are quite similar each day. They must drink water once a day, unlike some other birds. In the early morning, parrots will often flock together to a water source to drink, bathe and preen. After that, the flock will eat “breakfast,” moving a few kilometres away from watering places to feed. Most species look for food twice a day. The birds break around mid-morning to sit in the trees as they wait for hottest part of the day to pass, and finally they feed once more in the cool of the afternoon. Parrots are diurnal, meaning that they are only active during daytime hours. They often drink water one more time dusk before settling to their roost, and remain there until the sun rises again.

Parrots have attracted attention of bird enthusiasts, animal-lovers and many other people for a long time, and their smart, warm-hearted personalities have made them beloved around the world. They can survive on fairly simple diets of vegetables, fruits, and seeds, so they make low-maintenance pets, as well. Cockatiels and Budgerigars are both native to Australia and are some of the most popular birds to keep as pets. These days, the ones who are bred in captivity display even more varieties in colors. However, all parrots do need a few accommodations if they are kept captive. Namely, they need enough space to fly, light from the sun, areas to build their nests, and access to plenty of fresh water and food. Larger species of parrot, such as cockatoos and corellas are slightly higher maintenance. They need even more space, and may resort to destroying their habitat in fits of boredom. Some people who keep parrots as pets notice that they bond more with some members of the household than others, which may be explained by pair-bonding behavior of wild parrots. Parrots are probably most well-known for their ability to “talk,” as they can closely mimic the sounds of human voices. However, this is only seen in captive parrots. It is a mystery why wild parrots do not exhibit this behavior. It’s possible that the parrot’s relative intelligence causes it to try to bond with its owners through mimicry.

Reading Passage Vocabulary
Parrots

Parrots are an enormously diverse group of birds with over 330 species in total, and just 56 in Australia alone. Portuguese sailing expeditions once reported such a large quantity of birds that when mapmakers of the 14th century described the southern coast of Australia, they called it  Psittacorum Regio, or, “The Region of Parrots.” Parrots of Australia can be further split into three families, all stemming from the Psittaciformes order. Cockatoos, members of the Cacatuidae family, are genetically distinct from other parrots, as well as being the largest. They are described as having a solid build, strong moveable claws, and distinct, also moveable crests. However, most parrots native to Australia (up to 60% of Australia’s species) are part of the Psittacidae family, or “true parrot” family. Lastly, the Loriinae subfamily, including the well-known Lorikeets, are biologically different in ways that separate them from their other parrot relatives.

The way a parrot’s foot appears is unique to these birds, with the “zygodactylous” positioning of two of their toes pointing forwards and two pointing backwards. This gives parrots the ability to move skillfully through the trees using their feet, and all of their toes also end in long, sharply curved claws, allowing for an even stronger grip on tree trunks and slippery nuts or seed pods. The Psittaciformes order is the only group of birds known to have this particular beak and toe arrangement. Similarly to other birds, a protein called keratin are what forms a parrot’s feathers; it’s the same material that makes up our hair and nails.

The majority of parrots eat by tearing seed pods, pine cones and nuts apart, as they are specialized seed-eaters. They are also seen eating grass seeds and young shoots, and some species, especially lorikeets, also feed on nectar and pollen. The lorikeet’s  tongue structure has evolved to have a long papillae forming a brush-like texture in order to absorb as much of it as possible. Strong bills with a deep curve are a feature which define parrots as a bird species. Their upper mandible moves around, as the lower mandible sits almost unmoving inside the closed bill, which allows parrots to open seeds in their mouths with the help of their claws and tongues. Even though parrots are mostly herbivores, some also snack on insects and their larvae found under tree bark. Fruits like bananas, rainforest fruit and native figs are favorites for subtropical and tropical species. Seedeaters don’t have to compete for food much, as species of seed-bearing plants usually produce seeds simultaneously during the year. So, usually a whole flock of parrots searching for seeds together can find enough to eat. A flock’s social structure is especially advantageous for the cockatoos, who use a “watch bird” stationed in a nearby tree to keep an eye on the other birds as they feed, and signal them about any potential danger.

Parrot species native to Australia have spread across the continent. They can be found on the coasts, as well as dry grassy inland areas, and seem to thrive in all kinds of habitats. The Rock Parrot particularly likes the harsh saline dunes. Even though their feathers usually have brightly colored plumage, most species stay well-camouflaged, and only a quick flash of color under their wings would suggest anything otherwise. The Ground Parrot and the Night Parrot are the only two species who evolved to live anywhere on land. Other species prefer specific habitats. For example, the Mulga Parrot likes to live in arid and semi-arid woodlands or shrublands. Some rainforest species of parrot are the huge Palm Cockatoo and the sexually dimorphic, yet brightly colored Eclectus Parrot. Parrots do not often migrate, yet there are a few which will seek out specific flowering plants that they also help pollinate. For instance, the Galah, which can be found across the entire mainland as well as the island of Tasmania, is likely the most widespread type, while the commonly seen Rosellas are found in genetically distinct varieties in each Australian State.

Routines for parrots are quite similar each day. They must drink water once a day, unlike some other birds. In the early morning, parrots will often flock together to a water source to drink, bathe and preen. After that, the flock will eat “breakfast,” moving a few kilometres away from watering places to feed. Most species look for food twice a day. The birds break around mid-morning to sit in the trees as they wait for hottest part of the day to pass, and finally they feed once more in the cool of the afternoon. Parrots are diurnal, meaning that they are only active during daytime hours. They often drink water one more time dusk before settling to their roost, and remain there until the sun rises again.

Parrots have attracted attention of bird enthusiasts, animal-lovers and many other people for a long time, and their smart, warm-hearted personalities have made them beloved around the world. They can survive on fairly simple diets of vegetables, fruits, and seeds, so they make low-maintenance pets, as well. Cockatiels and Budgerigars are both native to Australia and are some of the most popular birds to keep as pets. These days, the ones who are bred in captivity display even more varieties in colors. However, all parrots do need a few accommodations if they are kept captive. Namely, they need enough space to fly, light from the sun, areas to build their nests, and access to plenty of fresh water and food. Larger species of parrot, such as cockatoos and corellas are slightly higher maintenance. They need even more space, and may resort to destroying their habitat in fits of boredom. Some people who keep parrots as pets notice that they bond more with some members of the household than others, which may be explained by pair-bonding behavior of wild parrots. Parrots are probably most well-known for their ability to “talk,” as they can closely mimic the sounds of human voices. However, this is only seen in captive parrots. It is a mystery why wild parrots do not exhibit this behavior. It’s possible that the parrot’s relative intelligence causes it to try to bond with its owners through mimicry.

 
IELTS Academic Reading Tips for Success
These are general tips that will appear on all reading questions.

coming soon

 
close
Hi, there!

Create your free beta account to use this feature.

close
Create your free beta account