IELTS Academic Reading Practice 73

 
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This reading practice simulates one part of the IELTS Academic Reading test. You should spend about twenty minutes on it. Read the passage and answer questions 1-13.

Questions 1-7

The reading passage has seven sections, A-G.

Choose the correct heading for sections A-G from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number i-xi in boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet.

List of Headings
  1. A number of ways of food promotion influencing children’s diet
  2. How food promotion affects children’s food predilections and their purchase behavior
  3. Next steps to improve the eating habits of children
  4. How television ads dominate children’s food promotion
  5. Establishing the relation between food promotion and diet or obesity
  6. Signals that children notice and enjoy food promotion
  7. The influence of other factors on children’s eating habits
  8. How findings tone down the effect that food promotion has on children
  9. Limitations in studies on food promotion
  10. General points of two sides of views between researchers
  11. How much children really know about food

1. Section A
2. Section B
3. Section C
4. Section D
5. Section E
6. Section F
7. Section G
Questions 8-13

Do the following statements reflect the claims of the writer in the reading passage? In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, write

YES   if the statement reflects the claims of the writer
NO   if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer
NOT GIVEN   if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

8. The commercial benefits from television advertising are less than in the past
9. Children usually learn a lot from educational campaigns directed at them
10. There is a clear connection between food advertising and diet related health problems
11. Research has proved that food publicity directly influences what children eat
12. As a result of watching TV advertising an adult and children eat more
13. The majority of the research carried out on the effects of food publicity has been directed at television advertising

Answer Sheet
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
N/A
15
N/A
16
N/A
17
N/A
18
N/A
19
N/A
20
N/A
21
N/A
22
N/A
23
N/A
24
N/A
25
N/A
26
N/A
27
N/A
28
N/A
29
N/A
30
N/A
31
N/A
32
N/A
33
N/A
34
N/A
35
N/A
36
N/A
37
N/A
38
N/A
39
N/A
40
N/A


  • help Learn how to HIGHLIGHT & ADD NOTES
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The Effects of Food Promotion

Section A

TV publicity plays a major role in marketing children food and the dominant part of this supports the supposed 'Big Four' of pre-sugared breakfast cereals, soft drinks, candy and flavorful snacks. In the last decade, advertising for fast food spots has rapidly grown. There is also proof that predominance of television has recently begun to wane. The importance of strong, global branding reinforces a need for multi-faceted communications combining television with merchandising, ‘tie-ins’ and point of sale activity.There's a dramatic difference between the publicised diet and the one advised by health advisors, and themes of fun and fantasy or taste, instead of nutrition and health, are utilized to promote it to children. In the meantime, the suggested diet gets minimal publicity support.

Section B

There is a lot of proof that children understand and appreciate food publicity. Be that as it may, establishing whether this really impacts them is an intricate issue. A review handled it by looking into researches that had analyzed conceivable impacts on what kids think about food, their food choices and their food habits (both buying and eating), and their health results (eg. weight or cholesterol levels). Most of the studies analyzed food publicizing, yet a few inspected other types of food promotion. In terms of nutritional knowledge, food publicizing appears to have little impact on kids' general perceptions of what makes up a healthy diet, but in certain areas, it does have an impact on more specific types of nutritional knowledge. For instance, seeing cereals and soft drinks adverts helped the little children unable to differentiate between products that have natural fruits.

Section C

A proof also derived from the review explains that food publicity impacts children food choices and their purchase habits. The primary school as a case study, for example, found out that awareness to publicized food influenced which one they professed to like, and another demonstrated that labelling and signage on a vending machine affected what was purchased by secondary school students. More research have additionally demonstrated that food advertising can impact what children eat. One, for instance, demonstrated that publicity affected a primary class's decision of day by day snacks at recess.

Section D

Comprehensive research is then to be done to prove whether or not a correlation exists between food advertising and diet. This is extremely difficult as it requires research to be done in real world settings. Various reviews have endeavoured this by examining the number of  TV viewing as a basis of exposure for TV publicity. A suitable connection has been made concerning TV viewing, diet, obesity and cholesterol levels. However, it is difficult to state, regardless of whether this impact is as a result of publicizing, the stationary factor of TV viewing, or snacking that may happen while viewing. A reviewed settled this issue by taking a look at a detailed diary of children’s viewing habits. This demonstrated the more food adverts they saw, the more snacks and calories they consumed.

Section E

In this manner, the research suggests food publicity is affecting children's diet in various ways. This does not amount to evidence; as noted above, it's difficult for research of this sort to come across indisputable confirmation. Not to mention much research had similar conclusions of not identifying an effect. Furthermore, only a few studies have endeavoured to undercover how solid these effects are with respect to different variables affecting kids' food choices. Nonetheless, numerous studies have discovered clear effects using complex approaches that make it possible to confirm that I) these effects are not only because of chance; ii) they are independent of different components that may impact diet, for example, parents diet attitudes or behaviours; and iii) they happen at a brand and classification level.

Section F

Also, two factors suggest that these findings make the effect of food publicity on children less noteworthy. To start with, the research centers primarily around TV publicizing. The summation of this effect accumulated with different types of marketing and advertising is probably going to be more noteworthy. Secondly, the research has mainly focused on the direct effects on individual children and downplay indirect effects. For instance, fast food adverts may influence children and also parents with the idea that it is a desirable behaviour.

Section G

In summary, no proof of an effect has been deduced, yet in our view, there is sufficient proof to reason that an effect exists. The next question then is, what should be done? and how commercial publicity can help better our children’s diet.

Reading Passage Vocabulary
The Effects of Food Promotion

Section A

TV publicity plays a major role in marketing children food and the dominant part of this supports the supposed 'Big Four' of pre-sugared breakfast cereals, soft drinks, candy and flavorful snacks. In the last decade, advertising for fast food spots has rapidly grown. There is also proof that predominance of television has recently begun to wane. The importance of strong, global branding reinforces a need for multi-faceted communications combining television with merchandising, ‘tie-ins’ and point of sale activity.There's a dramatic difference between the publicised diet and the one advised by health advisors, and themes of fun and fantasy or taste, instead of nutrition and health, are utilized to promote it to children. In the meantime, the suggested diet gets minimal publicity support.

Section B

There is a lot of proof that children understand and appreciate food publicity. Be that as it may, establishing whether this really impacts them is an intricate issue. A review handled it by looking into researches that had analyzed conceivable impacts on what kids think about food, their food choices and their food habits (both buying and eating), and their health results (eg. weight or cholesterol levels). Most of the studies analyzed food publicizing, yet a few inspected other types of food promotion. In terms of nutritional knowledge, food publicizing appears to have little impact on kids' general perceptions of what makes up a healthy diet, but in certain areas, it does have an impact on more specific types of nutritional knowledge. For instance, seeing cereals and soft drinks adverts helped the little children unable to differentiate between products that have natural fruits.

Section C

A proof also derived from the review explains that food publicity impacts children food choices and their purchase habits. The primary school as a case study, for example, found out that awareness to publicized food influenced which one they professed to like, and another demonstrated that labelling and signage on a vending machine affected what was purchased by secondary school students. More research have additionally demonstrated that food advertising can impact what children eat. One, for instance, demonstrated that publicity affected a primary class's decision of day by day snacks at recess.

Section D

Comprehensive research is then to be done to prove whether or not a correlation exists between food advertising and diet. This is extremely difficult as it requires research to be done in real world settings. Various reviews have endeavoured this by examining the number of  TV viewing as a basis of exposure for TV publicity. A suitable connection has been made concerning TV viewing, diet, obesity and cholesterol levels. However, it is difficult to state, regardless of whether this impact is as a result of publicizing, the stationary factor of TV viewing, or snacking that may happen while viewing. A reviewed settled this issue by taking a look at a detailed diary of children’s viewing habits. This demonstrated the more food adverts they saw, the more snacks and calories they consumed.

Section E

In this manner, the research suggests food publicity is affecting children's diet in various ways. This does not amount to evidence; as noted above, it's difficult for research of this sort to come across indisputable confirmation. Not to mention much research had similar conclusions of not identifying an effect. Furthermore, only a few studies have endeavoured to undercover how solid these effects are with respect to different variables affecting kids' food choices. Nonetheless, numerous studies have discovered clear effects using complex approaches that make it possible to confirm that I) these effects are not only because of chance; ii) they are independent of different components that may impact diet, for example, parents diet attitudes or behaviours; and iii) they happen at a brand and classification level.

Section F

Also, two factors suggest that these findings make the effect of food publicity on children less noteworthy. To start with, the research centers primarily around TV publicizing. The summation of this effect accumulated with different types of marketing and advertising is probably going to be more noteworthy. Secondly, the research has mainly focused on the direct effects on individual children and downplay indirect effects. For instance, fast food adverts may influence children and also parents with the idea that it is a desirable behaviour.

Section G

In summary, no proof of an effect has been deduced, yet in our view, there is sufficient proof to reason that an effect exists. The next question then is, what should be done? and how commercial publicity can help better our children’s diet.

 
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