IELTS® General Reading Practice 30

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Section A

In the immediate aftermath of Black Tuesday, Hoover sought to reassure Americans of the strong financial future of their country. In 1929 he was quoted as saying, “Any lack of confidence in the economic future or the strength of business in the United States is foolish.” Then, in 1931, he promised to provide federal aid in the case that starvation would ever become a reality in his country. When he stated this, though, thousands of American children and the elderly had already been starving to death. Some historians find fault with this president's selection of words and reactions when solving the great financial crisis during his presidency. While it is easy to criticize one's choice of words, a more balanced take on his rhetoric and personal ideals is necessary to truly understand Hoover's leadership approach.

Section B

Despite the evidence, Hoover was neither unsympathetic nor intentionally unsighted towards the obvious economic hurdles facing society at the time. That is, he simply subscribed to a set of beliefs that remained unaltered as society experienced the new reality of the Great Depression. Hoover strongly believed in the transformative power of “The American Dream”, which is the idea that steadfast hard work results in rewards. His own personal views were a fitting testament to that idea. Hoover was born into a poor family, put himself through college at a leading American university, and became an engineer. These experiences, in addition to his extensive world travels in Europe and Asia, shaped his ideas regarding The American Dream. 

Section C

The mere thought of providing assistance to the American people on behalf of the government was a strange and perhaps even harmful policy, according to Hoover, even during a time of economic crisis. However, what remains striking to historians who study Hoover is the opposite reaction he had employed in Europe. When Europeans needed assistance, such as in Belgium after World War I, Hoover jumped at the chance to provide hunger relief programs, which sought to alleviate the burden of food shopping with meager earnings. When it came to his home country, rather, he was known to believe that Americans would benefit from a different type of aid--one that would enable them to contribute directly to the efforts rather than solely “receiving” assistance, as was the case in Europe. This further showcases his belief that the government has the ability to “destroy” its citizens' characters, which he had been quoted as mentioning in various radio broadcasts of the time. 

Section D

Prior to the Great Depression, it had been noted that Hoover demonstrated an understanding of the potential harm that would fall upon the American population in terms of the great stock crash. During his time as Secretary of Commerce, Hoover had warned the previous president, Calvin Coolidge, of the potential risks, but these supposedly fell on deaf ears. Before his official inauguration, Hoover freely offered dozens of interviews to newspapers and magazines, urging Americans to cut back on their eager stock investments, and even encouraged the Federal Reserve to raise the discount rate. Many believe that this would have made it more expensive for local banks to lend money to speculators.  

Section E

Despite his predictions, neither Hoover, nor any other politician for that matter, had given serious thought to the government's exaggerated power when it came to regulating the stock market. This was even reminiscent of his personal choices and guiding principles, as Hoover often complained of having provided poor advice regarding stocks to business acquaintances, without realizing the true consequences of the counsel. When the crash came about, however, Hoover settled these business affairs by buying back all of the shares that he urged his acquaintances to purchase. Acclaimed by present-day historians as an example of Hoover's honest character, this anecdote is used to portray Hoover's somewhat inconsolable feelings of guilt, coupled with his veraciousness.

Section F

Acting along these guidelines, Hoover's response to the crash focused on two aspects that fit right along with “The American Dream”. He asked each and every American to work twice as hard as they already had, and pleaded businesses to keep workers on, despite the dwindling economy. Although the public's reception to Hoover's ideals was most mostly positive, not all American citizens immediately took on to his theories. Those who were recently unemployed, for example, believed Hoover's proclamations regarding work to be downright impossible. Further, womens' groups were also adamant in their protests for having been excluded from the economic rhetoric, since they were not as welcomed in the workforce as their male counterparts.

Section G

In order to appease the business community, Hoover sustained the idea that all would be resolved in the end if strong business practices were adhered to, even during a time of crisis. Due to his persuasive tactics, Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history. Many historians and politicians alike call upon these examples when citing presidential examples in terms of financial power and esteem.

28. iv - The statements, “Some historians find fault with this president's selection of words and reactions when solving the great financial crisis during his presidency. While it is easy to find fault from his words, a more balanced take on his rhetoric and personal ideals is necessary to truly understand Hoover's leadership approach.”, show that this is correct.
29. i - The statement, “Hoover was born into a poor family, put himself through college at a leading American university, and became an engineer.” along with the rest of the information about his early life prove that this is correct. 
30. x - The statements, “When Europeans needed assistance, such as in Belgium after World War I, Hoover jumped at the chance to provide hunger relief programs, which sought to alleviate the burden of food shopping with meager earnings. When it came to his home country, rather, he was known to believe that Americans would benefit from a different type of aid--one that would enable them to contribute directly to the efforts rather than solely “receiving” assistance, as was the case in Europe.” prove that this is correct.
31. ii - The statement, “During his time as Secretary of Commerce, Hoover had warned the previous president, Calvin Coolidge, of the potential risks, but these supposedly fell on deaf ears.” prove that this is correct.
32. viii - The statements, “When the crash came about, however, Hoover settled these business affairs by buying back all of the shares that he urged his acquaintances to purchase. Acclaimed by present-day historians as an example of Hoover's honest character, this anecdote is used to portray Hoover's somewhat inconsolable feelings of guilt, coupled with his veraciousness..” and Hoover's actions cause this to be correct.
33. iii - The statement, “He asked each and every American to work twice as hard as they already had, and pleaded businesses to keep workers on, despite the dwindling economy.” prove this to be correct.
34. v - The statements, “..Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history.” prove this to be correct.
35. B - The statement, “Despite his predictions, neither Hoover, nor any other politician for that matter, had given serious thought to the government's exaggerated power when it came to regulating the stock market.” proves this to be correct.
36. G - The statement, “This was even reminiscent of his personal choices and guiding principles, as Hoover often complained of having provided poor advice regarding stocks to business acquaintances, without realizing the true consequences of the counsel.” proves this to be correct.
37. C - The statement, “When the crash came about, however, Hoover settled these business affairs by buying back all of the shares that he urged his acquaintances to purchase.” proves this to be correct.
38. H - The statement, “He asked each and every American to work twice as hard as they already had, and pleaded businesses to keep workers on, despite the dwindling economy.” proves this to be correct.
39. A - The statement, “Due to his persuasive tactics, Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history.” proves this to be correct.
40. D - The statement, “Due to his persuasive tactics, Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history.” proves this to be correct.



This reading practice simulates the third section of the IELTS General Reading test. You should spend about twenty minutes on it. Read the passage(s) and answer questions 28-40.
Questions 28-34
The reading passage has seven sections, A-G.

Choose the correct heading for sections A-G from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number i-x in boxes 28-34 on your answer sheet.

List of Headings
  1. Early Life and Experiences
  2. Predictions of the Crash
  3. Response in Crisis
  4. Fallacy in Words
  5. Financial Know-How
  6. Burdens on Eastern Europeans
  7. The Later Years
  8. Principles Guiding Action
  9. Controversial Legacy
  10. Contradictions in Aid Relief

28. Section A

29. Section B

30. Section C

31. Section D

32. Section E

33. Section F

34. Section G

Questions 35-40
Complete the summary using the list of words, A-H, below.
  1. strategy
  2. forecast
  3. collapse
  4. era
  5. industry
  6. lie
  7. guidance
  8. labourers

Even though the of Hoover and other politicians regarding government regulations was incorrect, Hoover also believed that he had given untrustworthy about stocks. After the of the stock market, Hoover bought shares from a friend out of guilt for having steered him in the wrong direction. In times of difficulty, Hoover urged businesses to keep at hand, despite the lackluster economy. Thanks to a convincing  , a $160 million tax cut was passed, and Hoover is respected for his strength in a difficult .






Answer Sheet
1
N/A
2
N/A
3
N/A
4
N/A
5
N/A
6
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7
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8
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9
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10
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11
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12
N/A
13
N/A
14
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15
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16
N/A
17
N/A
18
N/A
19
N/A
20
N/A
21
N/A
22
N/A
23
N/A
24
N/A
25
N/A
26
N/A
27
N/A
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40


Reading Passage Vocabulary
President Hoover and the Reaction Heard 'Round the World


Section A

In the immediate aftermath of Black Tuesday, Hoover sought to reassure Americans of the strong financial future of their country. In 1929 he was quoted as saying, “Any lack of confidence in the economic future or the strength of business in the United States is foolish.” Then, in 1931, he promised to provide federal aid in the case that starvation would ever become a reality in his country. When he stated this, though, thousands of American children and the elderly had already been starving to death. Some historians find fault with this president's selection of words and reactions when solving the great financial crisis during his presidency. While it is easy to criticize one's choice of words, a more balanced take on his rhetoric and personal ideals is necessary to truly understand Hoover's leadership approach.

Section B

Despite the evidence, Hoover was neither unsympathetic nor intentionally unsighted towards the obvious economic hurdles facing society at the time. That is, he simply subscribed to a set of beliefs that remained unaltered as society experienced the new reality of the Great Depression. Hoover strongly believed in the transformative power of “The American Dream”, which is the idea that steadfast hard work results in rewards. His own personal views were a fitting testament to that idea. Hoover was born into a poor family, put himself through college at a leading American university, and became an engineer. These experiences, in addition to his extensive world travels in Europe and Asia, shaped his ideas regarding The American Dream. 

Section C

The mere thought of providing assistance to the American people on behalf of the government was a strange and perhaps even harmful policy, according to Hoover, even during a time of economic crisis. However, what remains striking to historians who study Hoover is the opposite reaction he had employed in Europe. When Europeans needed assistance, such as in Belgium after World War I, Hoover jumped at the chance to provide hunger relief programs, which sought to alleviate the burden of food shopping with meager earnings. When it came to his home country, rather, he was known to believe that Americans would benefit from a different type of aid--one that would enable them to contribute directly to the efforts rather than solely “receiving” assistance, as was the case in Europe. This further showcases his belief that the government has the ability to “destroy” its citizens' characters, which he had been quoted as mentioning in various radio broadcasts of the time. 

Section D

Prior to the Great Depression, it had been noted that Hoover demonstrated an understanding of the potential harm that would fall upon the American population in terms of the great stock crash. During his time as Secretary of Commerce, Hoover had warned the previous president, Calvin Coolidge, of the potential risks, but these supposedly fell on deaf ears. Before his official inauguration, Hoover freely offered dozens of interviews to newspapers and magazines, urging Americans to cut back on their eager stock investments, and even encouraged the Federal Reserve to raise the discount rate. Many believe that this would have made it more expensive for local banks to lend money to speculators.  

Section E

Despite his predictions, neither Hoover, nor any other politician for that matter, had given serious thought to the government's exaggerated power when it came to regulating the stock market. This was even reminiscent of his personal choices and guiding principles, as Hoover often complained of having provided poor advice regarding stocks to business acquaintances, without realizing the true consequences of the counsel. When the crash came about, however, Hoover settled these business affairs by buying back all of the shares that he urged his acquaintances to purchase. Acclaimed by present-day historians as an example of Hoover's honest character, this anecdote is used to portray Hoover's somewhat inconsolable feelings of guilt, coupled with his veraciousness.

Section F

Acting along these guidelines, Hoover's response to the crash focused on two aspects that fit right along with “The American Dream”. He asked each and every American to work twice as hard as they already had, and pleaded businesses to keep workers on, despite the dwindling economy. Although the public's reception to Hoover's ideals was most mostly positive, not all American citizens immediately took on to his theories. Those who were recently unemployed, for example, believed Hoover's proclamations regarding work to be downright impossible. Further, womens' groups were also adamant in their protests for having been excluded from the economic rhetoric, since they were not as welcomed in the workforce as their male counterparts.

Section G

In order to appease the business community, Hoover sustained the idea that all would be resolved in the end if strong business practices were adhered to, even during a time of crisis. Due to his persuasive tactics, Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history. Many historians and politicians alike call upon these examples when citing presidential examples in terms of financial power and esteem.

28. iv - The statements, “Some historians find fault with this president's selection of words and reactions when solving the great financial crisis during his presidency. While it is easy to find fault from his words, a more balanced take on his rhetoric and personal ideals is necessary to truly understand Hoover's leadership approach.”, show that this is correct.
29. i - The statement, “Hoover was born into a poor family, put himself through college at a leading American university, and became an engineer.” along with the rest of the information about his early life prove that this is correct. 
30. x - The statements, “When Europeans needed assistance, such as in Belgium after World War I, Hoover jumped at the chance to provide hunger relief programs, which sought to alleviate the burden of food shopping with meager earnings. When it came to his home country, rather, he was known to believe that Americans would benefit from a different type of aid--one that would enable them to contribute directly to the efforts rather than solely “receiving” assistance, as was the case in Europe.” prove that this is correct.
31. ii - The statement, “During his time as Secretary of Commerce, Hoover had warned the previous president, Calvin Coolidge, of the potential risks, but these supposedly fell on deaf ears.” prove that this is correct.
32. viii - The statements, “When the crash came about, however, Hoover settled these business affairs by buying back all of the shares that he urged his acquaintances to purchase. Acclaimed by present-day historians as an example of Hoover's honest character, this anecdote is used to portray Hoover's somewhat inconsolable feelings of guilt, coupled with his veraciousness..” and Hoover's actions cause this to be correct.
33. iii - The statement, “He asked each and every American to work twice as hard as they already had, and pleaded businesses to keep workers on, despite the dwindling economy.” prove this to be correct.
34. v - The statements, “..Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history.” prove this to be correct.
35. B - The statement, “Despite his predictions, neither Hoover, nor any other politician for that matter, had given serious thought to the government's exaggerated power when it came to regulating the stock market.” proves this to be correct.
36. G - The statement, “This was even reminiscent of his personal choices and guiding principles, as Hoover often complained of having provided poor advice regarding stocks to business acquaintances, without realizing the true consequences of the counsel.” proves this to be correct.
37. C - The statement, “When the crash came about, however, Hoover settled these business affairs by buying back all of the shares that he urged his acquaintances to purchase.” proves this to be correct.
38. H - The statement, “He asked each and every American to work twice as hard as they already had, and pleaded businesses to keep workers on, despite the dwindling economy.” proves this to be correct.
39. A - The statement, “Due to his persuasive tactics, Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history.” proves this to be correct.
40. D - The statement, “Due to his persuasive tactics, Hoover was able to pass a $160 million tax cut in order to bolster the American economy. For this reason, Hoover is known to be a calming force (with strong financial and negotiating skills) in a turbulent time in American history.” proves this to be correct.
 
IELTS General Reading Tips for Success
These are general tips that will appear on all reading questions.

Tips to improve your reading speed
To get a high score on the IELTS reading section, you need to have a fast reading speed. To have a fast reading speed, you need to improve your vocabulary and practice dissecting sentences. One strategy to dissect a sentence is to look for the subject and verb of the sentence. Finding the subject and verb will help you better understand the main idea of said sentence. Keep in mind, a common feature of a IELTS reading passage is to join strings of ideas to form long compound sentences. This produces large chunks that students have a hard time absorbing. Do not get overwhelmed by its length, just look for the subject and verb, the rest of the ideas will flow.


Keep in mind, having a slow reading speed makes skimming or scanning a reading passage more difficult. The process of quickly skimming through a reading passage for specific keywords or main ideas is a requirement for you to employ successful reading strategies to improve your IELTS reading score. In other words, skimming and scanning are critical skills to ensure you complete all questions in the allotted time frame.
IELTS Reading Strategies
Once you can read and comprehend a passage with a rate of, at least, 220 words per minute, you'll be ready to start implementing our strategies. All too often, students spend too much time reading the passages and not enough time answering the questions. Here is a step by step guide for tackling the reading section.

  1. Step 1: Read questions first

    One of the most common mistakes that candidates make when approaching the reading exam is reading every single word of the passages. Although you can practice for the exam by reading for pleasure, "reading blindly" (reading without any sense of what the questions will ask) will not do you any favors in the exam. Instead, it will hurt your chances for effectively managing your time and getting the best score.

    The main reason to read the questions first is because the type of question may determine what you read in the passage or how you read it. For example, some question types will call for the "skimming" technique, while others may call for the "scanning" technique.

    It is important to answer a set of questions that are of the same question type. You'll need to determine which question type you want to tackle first. A good strategy would be to start with the easier question type and move on to more difficult question types later. The Easiest question types are the ones where you spend less time reading. For example, the Matching Heading question type is an easier one because you only need to find the heading that best describes the main idea of a paragraph. An example of a difficult question type would be Identifying Information. For this question type, you'll need to read each paragraph to find out if each statement is TRUE, FALSE, or NOT GIVEN according to the passage.

    Here is a table that lists the difficulty levels for each question type. Use this table as a reference when choosing which question type you want to tackle first.


    Difficulty level Question Type
    Easy Sentence Completion
    Short answer
    Medium Matching Features
    Multiple choice
    Matching Headings
    Summary, Table, Flow-Chart Completion
    Difficult Matching Sentence Endings
    Matching Information
    Identifying Information (TRUE/FALSE/NOT GIVEN)
    Identifying Viewer's claims (YES/NO/NOT GIVEN)

  2. Step 2: Read for an objective

    After you've read the questions for the passage, you will be able to read for an objective. What does this mean? For example, if you come across a question that includes the year "1896", you can make a note of when this year comes up in the text, using it to answer the question later on. There are two reading techniques that will help you stay on track with reading for an objective. The first one, skimming, is best defined as reading fast in order to get the "gist", or general idea, or a passage. With this technique, you are not stopping for any unfamiliar words or looking for specific details. The second technique, scanning, is best defined as reading for specific information. With this technique, you are not reading for the overall gist, but rather, specific information. Notice how each of these techniques has a specific objective in mind. This will help you find information more quickly.

  3. Step 3: Take notes

    As you're reading for an objective, you should also be making notes on the margins of the passage, placing stars next to key information, or underlining things that you believe will help you answer the various questions. This will make it easier for you to check back when you are asked certain things in the questions. Choose whichever note-taking system is right for you - just make sure you do it!

  4. Step 4: Answer wisely

    After you've read the questions, read the passage, and have taken any appropriate notes, you you should have located the part of the text where you where you need to read carefully. Then just read carefully and think critically to determine the correct answer.

 
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