IELTS Listening Practice 120

 
Audio question: 
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Questions 31-37

Complete the notes below.  

Write NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

How to take effective notes:

Organise notes by writing important details of the page.

Write down key points in

Develop a of signs and abbreviations, and use instead of full sentences. Leave between each line to make extra notes.

In mind-mapping, use large circles for each topic. Use thick lines for main points and lines for details.

Active listeners listen for that highlight what is important.

 
This listening practice simulates the fourth section of the IELTS Listening test. Listen to the audio and answer questions 31-37.

  • library_books Audio Script

    (Section 4: You will hear a talk explaining how to take effective notes. First, you will have some time to look at questions 31 to 40 [20 seconds]. Listen carefully and answer questions 31 to 40.)

    J=James

    D=Donna

    J: Hello everyone. Welcome to today’s lecture on the subject of how to take effective notes. This is one in a series of lectures organized by Student Services and the Student Union for new students during orientation week to help them get the most out of their university experience. Obviously note-taking is going to be very important subject for you all. Some might say that it is one of the keys to success at university, and many students have difficulty with it at first. It is my pleasure to welcome Donna Jones to the stage. Denise is a librarian here at the university. Donna is working with the Student Ambassadors team this week but has made time in her busy schedule to talk to us today. Welcome, Donna.

    D: Thank you very much, James. It’s a pleasure to be here with you all today. Now, as James mentioned, having the skills to take effective notes is essential for students, and is very important to academic and professional success. Notes can help you finish projects properly and pass tests and assignments. However, you may not be sure how to take them in a way that is efficient so I’m going to run through a few tips.

    The first thing to say is that you should keep your notes organized by writing important details at the top of each page. Include information such as the date, bibliographic information, and page number of your notes. Noting details can make it easier for you to return to your notes and get important information.

    You should also use your own language. Write down key facts, ideas, and details in your own words. Avoid noting anything in the text verbatim, or word for word, unless it is a phrase or quote you may later use. Taking notes in your own words actively engages your brain, helps you better understand the text, makes you more likely to retain the information, and may minimize the risk of plagiarism.

    Develop your own system of signs and abbreviations that can help you more quickly take notes and review them. For example, “SM” for “scientific method.” Write keywords instead of complete sentences. Think about the text you’re reading or the lecture you’re listening to—they may be a bit dense and hard to understand. Avoid using these models when you write your notes. Instead, use keywords to say the same things in a short and manageable way that you can easily and quickly review later. As you write your keywords and ideas down, leave space between each line. Having extra room allows you to make additional notes or clarify points that you may not understand. This helps you quickly have and identify all of the relevant material to that keyword or thought.

    Another good methods is to draw your notes with mind-mapping. Draw large circles and write specific topics you hear or read in them. Use thicker lines to indicate main points and write a brief keyword or two that summarize supporting information to the topic. Finally, add shorter and thinner lines for supporting details. Mind mapping can be an especially useful tool if you are a visual learner or you don’t know a lecturer’s style.

    Listen carefully to the speaker. Be an active listener during your class or meeting. Avoid distractions such as other people, your computer, and social media accounts. Listening carefully can help you take better notes, understand the material, and remember it at a later date. Part of being an active listener is hearing signal words that tell you something important is being said that you should write in your notes. Listen for words such as ‘importantly’ or ‘significantly’ that highlight what the speaker thinks is key.

    After your lecture or meeting, review your notes as soon as you can. Note any spots that need clarification or that you don’t understand. Reviewing your notes quickly after you write them can ensure that you understand and have an accurate record of the lecture or meeting.

    That’s all the advice for today. Remember, if you missed anything from today’s lecture, you can look up the PowerPoint slides on the Student Portal. Best of luck with your studies …

Answer Sheet
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Listening Script Vocabulary

(Section 4: You will hear a talk explaining how to take effective notes. First, you will have some time to look at questions 31 to 40 [20 seconds]. Listen carefully and answer questions 31 to 40.)

J=James

D=Donna

J: Hello everyone. Welcome to today’s lecture on the subject of how to take effective notes. This is one in a series of lectures organized by Student Services and the Student Union for new students during orientation week to help them get the most out of their university experience. Obviously note-taking is going to be very important subject for you all. Some might say that it is one of the keys to success at university, and many students have difficulty with it at first. It is my pleasure to welcome Donna Jones to the stage. Denise is a librarian here at the university. Donna is working with the Student Ambassadors team this week but has made time in her busy schedule to talk to us today. Welcome, Donna.

D: Thank you very much, James. It’s a pleasure to be here with you all today. Now, as James mentioned, having the skills to take effective notes is essential for students, and is very important to academic and professional success. Notes can help you finish projects properly and pass tests and assignments. However, you may not be sure how to take them in a way that is efficient so I’m going to run through a few tips.

The first thing to say is that you should keep your notes organized by writing important details at the top of each page. Include information such as the date, bibliographic information, and page number of your notes. Noting details can make it easier for you to return to your notes and get important information.

You should also use your own language. Write down key facts, ideas, and details in your own words. Avoid noting anything in the text verbatim, or word for word, unless it is a phrase or quote you may later use. Taking notes in your own words actively engages your brain, helps you better understand the text, makes you more likely to retain the information, and may minimize the risk of plagiarism.

Develop your own system of signs and abbreviations that can help you more quickly take notes and review them. For example, “SM” for “scientific method.” Write keywords instead of complete sentences. Think about the text you’re reading or the lecture you’re listening to—they may be a bit dense and hard to understand. Avoid using these models when you write your notes. Instead, use keywords to say the same things in a short and manageable way that you can easily and quickly review later. As you write your keywords and ideas down, leave space between each line. Having extra room allows you to make additional notes or clarify points that you may not understand. This helps you quickly have and identify all of the relevant material to that keyword or thought.

Another good methods is to draw your notes with mind-mapping. Draw large circles and write specific topics you hear or read in them. Use thicker lines to indicate main points and write a brief keyword or two that summarize supporting information to the topic. Finally, add shorter and thinner lines for supporting details. Mind mapping can be an especially useful tool if you are a visual learner or you don’t know a lecturer’s style.

Listen carefully to the speaker. Be an active listener during your class or meeting. Avoid distractions such as other people, your computer, and social media accounts. Listening carefully can help you take better notes, understand the material, and remember it at a later date. Part of being an active listener is hearing signal words that tell you something important is being said that you should write in your notes. Listen for words such as ‘importantly’ or ‘significantly’ that highlight what the speaker thinks is key.

After your lecture or meeting, review your notes as soon as you can. Note any spots that need clarification or that you don’t understand. Reviewing your notes quickly after you write them can ensure that you understand and have an accurate record of the lecture or meeting.

That’s all the advice for today. Remember, if you missed anything from today’s lecture, you can look up the PowerPoint slides on the Student Portal. Best of luck with your studies …

IELTS Listening Tips for Success
These are general tips that will appear on all listening questions.

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