IELTS® General Reading Practice 42

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Section A

It can be argued that all countries in the global community have experienced resounding change throughout history. However, China continues to provide intriguing case studies and examples of social change, due to its fair share of changing government systems that have come into power throughout its rich history. From corrupt dynasties to a People's Republic, China is not foreign to the concept of modifying its form of government.  Something new that China has begun to investigate, however, is the process of globalization. The concept of globalization is best understood by social scientists as the process by which organizations begin to develop influence on the larger, international scale. Along with globalization comes the process of modernization, which could pose difficulties for a country heavily rooted in traditions and customs. While there are advantages of becoming more involved in the global community, disadvantages have also arisen, posing challenges to this new change. 

Section B

In China's case, the concept of modernization is difficult to balance with its rich traditional history.  How does a country that has been known for being quite closed-off from the rest of the world “open up” and branch off into the global community?  Moreover, how should such a country expect its citizens to become accustomed to a new way of life? Scholars have spent time analyzing these questions and projecting possible outcomes based on history and current societal trends. One such scholar is   Michael Meyer, the author of The Last Days of Old Beijing, who has been exploring China's quest towards globalization throughout the past two decades. The progression of the storyline in The Last Days of Old Beijing, as well as its introduction of characters, both play an important part in the reader's understanding of China's progression with globalization.   

Section C

Although Meyer's planning of the chapters in his book may have been merely coincidence, the structure is uncannily connected to China's progression towards globalization, in that it showcases the country's initial government structures and finishes with its modern outlook.  For the reader, the book is not only a reminder of China's past history, but also serves as a symbol of China's past merging with the approaching future of modernization. The author examines what, exactly, these intentions of modernization are, and how the country expects its citizens to implement these plans. In addition, a substantial review of the country's failures and how they unfolded in front of the global community plays an imperative part in assessing China's ability to transform itself.

Section D

China has experienced quite a few setbacks while developing a new image for itself and integrating with the international community.  In 2005, for instance, China struggled to balance the economy with its environmental impacts. An explosion of a chemical factory in Jilin, located in the northeast area of the country, caused troubles for not only China's economy, but also for that of Russia, since the chemicals in the Songhua River flowed into the Amur River in Russia. This is just one example of China's failure in producing a positive image for itself within the international community. These setbacks, however, should also serve as a reminder to the global community when it comes to understanding the pressure that China has been faced with in terms of managing its reputation over time.

Section E

Perhaps one of the most pivotal and memorable shifts in China's society occured in 2007, when the country was faced with a large amount of pressure when hosting the Olympic Games. When the Chinese government knew that it had been selected to host the Olympics, officials swiftly called for changes in how Beijing operated on a daily basis. An analysis of routine activities in the city resulted in attempts to make it appear more accepting and modern to the international community. This result impacted the global image of China and had an effect on its ordinary citizens who were not affiliated with the Olympic games.  Not only were shopping malls, apartments, and roads replacing the hutongs, but English was slowly replacing the Chinese language. Officials wanted citizens to be familiar with the English language, and had high hopes for teaching it to older citizens, police officers, and children in order to best accommodate international guests, athletes, and tourists.     

Section F

 In addition to Meyer's work and countless other published works, a notable book has dramatically shaped the ways in which people are able to understand China through literature. In the book, City Between Worlds: My Hong Kong, author Leo Ou-fan Lee discusses that “a person (or a whole city) should never be trapped in one identity, since all of us now have 'multiple identities'”. After more than a decade since Beijing hosted the Olympic games, this idea tends to be the overarching theme for present-day China. Although China has introduced Western aspects into their own culture, such as the English language and the addition of large chain stores such as Wal-Mart, it still wishes to embrace its culture.

29. vii - The statement, “Something new that China has begun to investigate, however, is the process of globalization.” along with the rest of the paragraph's information about globalization makes this the best option. 
30. x - The statement, “In China's case, the concept of modernization is difficult to balance with its rich traditional history.” proves that this is correct.
31. i - The statement, “The author examines what, exactly, these intentions of modernization are, and how the country expects its citizens to implement these plans.” is the biggest clue as to the correct heading.
32. iv - The statement, “China has experienced quite a few setbacks while developing a new image for itself and integrating with the international community.” is the biggest clue as to the correct heading.
33. ii - The statements, “When the Chinese government knew that it had been selected to host the Olympics, officials swiftly called for changes in how Beijing operated on a daily basis. An analysis of routine activities in the city resulted in attempts to make it appear more accepting and modern to the international community.” show that this is correct.
34. ix - The statement, “In the book, City Between Worlds: My Hong Kong, author Leo Ou-fan Lee discusses that “a person (or a whole city) should never be trapped in one identity, since all of us now have 'multiple identities'”. Is the biggest clue as to the correct heading.
35. A - The statement, “China has experienced quite a few setbacks while developing a new image for itself and integrating with the international community.” proves this to be correct.
36. G - The statement, “An explosion of a chemical factory in Jilin, located in the northeast area of the country, caused troubles for not only China's economy, but also for that of Russia, since the chemicals in the Songhua River flowed into the Amur River in Russia.” proves this to be correct.
37. B - The statement, “This is just one example of China's failure in producing a positive image for itself within the international community.” proves this to be correct.
38. E - The statement, “When the Chinese government knew that it had been selected to host the Olympics, officials swiftly called for changes in how Beijing operated on a daily basis.” proves this to be correct.
39. H - The statement, “Officials wanted citizens to be familiar with the English language, and had high hopes for teaching it to older citizens, police officers, and children in order to best accommodate international guests, athletes, and tourists.” proves this to be correct.      
40. D - The statement, “Although China has introduced Western aspects into their own culture, such as the English language and the addition of large chain stores such as Wal-Mart, it still wishes to embrace its culture.” proves this to be correct.




This reading practice simulates the third section of the IELTS General Reading test. You should spend about twenty minutes on it. Read the passage(s) and answer questions 29-40.
Questions 29-34
The reading passage has six sections, A-F.

Choose the correct heading for sections A-F from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number i-x in boxes 29-34 on your answer sheet.

List of Headings
  1. Questioning Progression
  2. Revamping and Replacing in Preparation
  3. World Influence on Style
  4. Experiencing Hurdles
  5. Direct Effects of War
  6. Facing Financial Burdens
  7. Exploring Globalization
  8. Government Regulations
  9. China's Various Cultural Faces
  10. Balancing Modernity with History

29. Section A

30. Section B

31. Section C

32. Section D

33. Section E

34. Section F

Questions 35-40
Complete the summary using the list of words, A-H, below.
  1. problems
  2. representation
  3. celebration
  4. features
  5. modifications
  6. fire
  7. eruption
  8. residents

China has faced a large amount of as a unique country in the global community. Due to a well-publicized in Jilin and other problems, it was obvious that China was having a difficult time creating a favourable of itself. Thus, it makes sense that 38 demanded by the government were made in preparation for the Olympics. One example of this was having certain of the country learn English. However, some believe that despite the introduction of Western , China still wants to embrace its own culture.






Answer Sheet
1
N/A
2
N/A
3
N/A
4
N/A
5
N/A
6
N/A
7
N/A
8
N/A
9
N/A
10
N/A
11
N/A
12
N/A
13
N/A
14
N/A
15
N/A
16
N/A
17
N/A
18
N/A
19
N/A
20
N/A
21
N/A
22
N/A
23
N/A
24
N/A
25
N/A
26
N/A
27
N/A
28
N/A
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40


Reading Passage Vocabulary
Globalization in a Changing Chinese Landscape


Section A

It can be argued that all countries in the global community have experienced resounding change throughout history. However, China continues to provide intriguing case studies and examples of social change, due to its fair share of changing government systems that have come into power throughout its rich history. From corrupt dynasties to a People's Republic, China is not foreign to the concept of modifying its form of government.  Something new that China has begun to investigate, however, is the process of globalization. The concept of globalization is best understood by social scientists as the process by which organizations begin to develop influence on the larger, international scale. Along with globalization comes the process of modernization, which could pose difficulties for a country heavily rooted in traditions and customs. While there are advantages of becoming more involved in the global community, disadvantages have also arisen, posing challenges to this new change. 

Section B

In China's case, the concept of modernization is difficult to balance with its rich traditional history.  How does a country that has been known for being quite closed-off from the rest of the world “open up” and branch off into the global community?  Moreover, how should such a country expect its citizens to become accustomed to a new way of life? Scholars have spent time analyzing these questions and projecting possible outcomes based on history and current societal trends. One such scholar is   Michael Meyer, the author of The Last Days of Old Beijing, who has been exploring China's quest towards globalization throughout the past two decades. The progression of the storyline in The Last Days of Old Beijing, as well as its introduction of characters, both play an important part in the reader's understanding of China's progression with globalization.   

Section C

Although Meyer's planning of the chapters in his book may have been merely coincidence, the structure is uncannily connected to China's progression towards globalization, in that it showcases the country's initial government structures and finishes with its modern outlook.  For the reader, the book is not only a reminder of China's past history, but also serves as a symbol of China's past merging with the approaching future of modernization. The author examines what, exactly, these intentions of modernization are, and how the country expects its citizens to implement these plans. In addition, a substantial review of the country's failures and how they unfolded in front of the global community plays an imperative part in assessing China's ability to transform itself.

Section D

China has experienced quite a few setbacks while developing a new image for itself and integrating with the international community.  In 2005, for instance, China struggled to balance the economy with its environmental impacts. An explosion of a chemical factory in Jilin, located in the northeast area of the country, caused troubles for not only China's economy, but also for that of Russia, since the chemicals in the Songhua River flowed into the Amur River in Russia. This is just one example of China's failure in producing a positive image for itself within the international community. These setbacks, however, should also serve as a reminder to the global community when it comes to understanding the pressure that China has been faced with in terms of managing its reputation over time.

Section E

Perhaps one of the most pivotal and memorable shifts in China's society occured in 2007, when the country was faced with a large amount of pressure when hosting the Olympic Games. When the Chinese government knew that it had been selected to host the Olympics, officials swiftly called for changes in how Beijing operated on a daily basis. An analysis of routine activities in the city resulted in attempts to make it appear more accepting and modern to the international community. This result impacted the global image of China and had an effect on its ordinary citizens who were not affiliated with the Olympic games.  Not only were shopping malls, apartments, and roads replacing the hutongs, but English was slowly replacing the Chinese language. Officials wanted citizens to be familiar with the English language, and had high hopes for teaching it to older citizens, police officers, and children in order to best accommodate international guests, athletes, and tourists.     

Section F

 In addition to Meyer's work and countless other published works, a notable book has dramatically shaped the ways in which people are able to understand China through literature. In the book, City Between Worlds: My Hong Kong, author Leo Ou-fan Lee discusses that “a person (or a whole city) should never be trapped in one identity, since all of us now have 'multiple identities'”. After more than a decade since Beijing hosted the Olympic games, this idea tends to be the overarching theme for present-day China. Although China has introduced Western aspects into their own culture, such as the English language and the addition of large chain stores such as Wal-Mart, it still wishes to embrace its culture.

29. vii - The statement, “Something new that China has begun to investigate, however, is the process of globalization.” along with the rest of the paragraph's information about globalization makes this the best option. 
30. x - The statement, “In China's case, the concept of modernization is difficult to balance with its rich traditional history.” proves that this is correct.
31. i - The statement, “The author examines what, exactly, these intentions of modernization are, and how the country expects its citizens to implement these plans.” is the biggest clue as to the correct heading.
32. iv - The statement, “China has experienced quite a few setbacks while developing a new image for itself and integrating with the international community.” is the biggest clue as to the correct heading.
33. ii - The statements, “When the Chinese government knew that it had been selected to host the Olympics, officials swiftly called for changes in how Beijing operated on a daily basis. An analysis of routine activities in the city resulted in attempts to make it appear more accepting and modern to the international community.” show that this is correct.
34. ix - The statement, “In the book, City Between Worlds: My Hong Kong, author Leo Ou-fan Lee discusses that “a person (or a whole city) should never be trapped in one identity, since all of us now have 'multiple identities'”. Is the biggest clue as to the correct heading.
35. A - The statement, “China has experienced quite a few setbacks while developing a new image for itself and integrating with the international community.” proves this to be correct.
36. G - The statement, “An explosion of a chemical factory in Jilin, located in the northeast area of the country, caused troubles for not only China's economy, but also for that of Russia, since the chemicals in the Songhua River flowed into the Amur River in Russia.” proves this to be correct.
37. B - The statement, “This is just one example of China's failure in producing a positive image for itself within the international community.” proves this to be correct.
38. E - The statement, “When the Chinese government knew that it had been selected to host the Olympics, officials swiftly called for changes in how Beijing operated on a daily basis.” proves this to be correct.
39. H - The statement, “Officials wanted citizens to be familiar with the English language, and had high hopes for teaching it to older citizens, police officers, and children in order to best accommodate international guests, athletes, and tourists.” proves this to be correct.      
40. D - The statement, “Although China has introduced Western aspects into their own culture, such as the English language and the addition of large chain stores such as Wal-Mart, it still wishes to embrace its culture.” proves this to be correct.

 
IELTS General Reading Tips for Success
These are general tips that will appear on all reading questions.

Tips to improve your reading speed
To get a high score on the IELTS reading section, you need to have a fast reading speed. To have a fast reading speed, you need to improve your vocabulary and practice dissecting sentences. One strategy to dissect a sentence is to look for the subject and verb of the sentence. Finding the subject and verb will help you better understand the main idea of said sentence. Keep in mind, a common feature of a IELTS reading passage is to join strings of ideas to form long compound sentences. This produces large chunks that students have a hard time absorbing. Do not get overwhelmed by its length, just look for the subject and verb, the rest of the ideas will flow.


Keep in mind, having a slow reading speed makes skimming or scanning a reading passage more difficult. The process of quickly skimming through a reading passage for specific keywords or main ideas is a requirement for you to employ successful reading strategies to improve your IELTS reading score. In other words, skimming and scanning are critical skills to ensure you complete all questions in the allotted time frame.
IELTS Reading Strategies
Once you can read and comprehend a passage with a rate of, at least, 220 words per minute, you'll be ready to start implementing our strategies. All too often, students spend too much time reading the passages and not enough time answering the questions. Here is a step by step guide for tackling the reading section.

  1. Step 1: Read questions first

    One of the most common mistakes that candidates make when approaching the reading exam is reading every single word of the passages. Although you can practice for the exam by reading for pleasure, "reading blindly" (reading without any sense of what the questions will ask) will not do you any favors in the exam. Instead, it will hurt your chances for effectively managing your time and getting the best score.

    The main reason to read the questions first is because the type of question may determine what you read in the passage or how you read it. For example, some question types will call for the "skimming" technique, while others may call for the "scanning" technique.

    It is important to answer a set of questions that are of the same question type. You'll need to determine which question type you want to tackle first. A good strategy would be to start with the easier question type and move on to more difficult question types later. The Easiest question types are the ones where you spend less time reading. For example, the Matching Heading question type is an easier one because you only need to find the heading that best describes the main idea of a paragraph. An example of a difficult question type would be Identifying Information. For this question type, you'll need to read each paragraph to find out if each statement is TRUE, FALSE, or NOT GIVEN according to the passage.

    Here is a table that lists the difficulty levels for each question type. Use this table as a reference when choosing which question type you want to tackle first.


    Difficulty level Question Type
    Easy Sentence Completion
    Short answer
    Medium Matching Features
    Multiple choice
    Matching Headings
    Summary, Table, Flow-Chart Completion
    Difficult Matching Sentence Endings
    Matching Information
    Identifying Information (TRUE/FALSE/NOT GIVEN)
    Identifying Viewer's claims (YES/NO/NOT GIVEN)

  2. Step 2: Read for an objective

    After you've read the questions for the passage, you will be able to read for an objective. What does this mean? For example, if you come across a question that includes the year "1896", you can make a note of when this year comes up in the text, using it to answer the question later on. There are two reading techniques that will help you stay on track with reading for an objective. The first one, skimming, is best defined as reading fast in order to get the "gist", or general idea, or a passage. With this technique, you are not stopping for any unfamiliar words or looking for specific details. The second technique, scanning, is best defined as reading for specific information. With this technique, you are not reading for the overall gist, but rather, specific information. Notice how each of these techniques has a specific objective in mind. This will help you find information more quickly.

  3. Step 3: Take notes

    As you're reading for an objective, you should also be making notes on the margins of the passage, placing stars next to key information, or underlining things that you believe will help you answer the various questions. This will make it easier for you to check back when you are asked certain things in the questions. Choose whichever note-taking system is right for you - just make sure you do it!

  4. Step 4: Answer wisely

    After you've read the questions, read the passage, and have taken any appropriate notes, you you should have located the part of the text where you where you need to read carefully. Then just read carefully and think critically to determine the correct answer.

 
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