IELTS Listening Practice 26

 
Audio question: 
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Questions 11-14

Complete the table below.  

Write NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

Desert Camping
Interviewee Carla Lambert
When to go
What to bring
Tips: Tell someone Where
When
Questions 15-16

Choose the correct letter, A, B, or C.

Write your answers in boxes 15-16 on your answer sheet.

15 According to Carla, what is the main danger when desert camping?

16 How does Carla feel about ‘dune bashing’?

Questions 17-19

Choose three letters A-F.

Write your answers in boxes 17-19 on your answer sheet.

What preparations does Carla recommend?
  1. bring games for children
  2. bring plenty of water
  3. charge your mobile before you leave home
  4. get a phone charger for your car
  5. camp with a group
  6. don’t travel with more than two cars

17
18
19
Questions 20-21

Choose two letters A-E.

Write your answers in boxes 20-21 on your answer sheet.

What does Carla say about the vehicles?
  1. you can’t drive on sand with tyres full of air
  2. cars easily get stuck in the sand
  3. you might need to pull a vehicle out of the sand
  4. a jeep is not suitable for the desert
  5. the vehicles need to be able to drive fast

20
21
 
This listening practice simulates the second section of the IELTS Listening test. Listen to the audio and answer questions 11-21.

  • library_books Audio Script

    (Section 2: You will hear a radio presenter interviewing a woman about her experiences of desert camping. First, you will have some time to look at questions 11 to 21 [20 seconds]. Listen carefully and answer questions 11 to 21.)

    I = INTERVIEWER

    C = Carla

    I: Hello Listeners. Today I have Carla Lambert in the studio talking about her experiences of desert camping. Carla lived in Dubai for 5 years and took many short trips into the desert with friends and family. As you probably know, temperatures in the desert get pretty high – up to 50 degrees Celsius in the height of summer – so Carla is going to give us some survival tips about how to make a success of a trip in such a harsh climate.  Carla, what are your tips for desert camping?

    C: Well. Obviously, it’s not recommended to go in the summer months because, as you said, the temperatures are so high from May to August. November to March are lovely months for camping. The temperatures are quite cool for the region then although it does also get quite cold at night and you definitely need to bring extra blankets to sleep in. My number one tip is always to tell someone at home where you’re going and when you’ll be back. That way, they will look out for your return and raise the alarm if you don’t arrive when you said you would.

    I: Right. And can you explain a bit more about the dangers of desert camping.

    C: Sure. Well, the main danger, I suppose, is the harsh climate because if your vehicle overheats in the sun or your car’s air conditioning breaks down it would really be quite dangerous to have no shelter.

    I: Right. And do the vehicles get damaged?

    C: Mmm, well, they can do if you’re reckless. I mean, part of the fun of desert camping is the dune bashing. So, dune bashing is when you drive your vehicle over the sand dunes. Some of them are really high so it can be quite scary for beginners. And also dangerous, of course, because the car can topple over if you aren’t an experienced driver or it you’re simply not paying attention. If you’re careful, though, it’s perfectly safe. But most of all it’s great fun to drive over the dunes up and down, a real adrenaline rush.

    I: I see. And what kind of preparations do you have to make before going on a desert camping trip?

    C: Well, you don’t want to run out of water so stock up before you leave the city. Bring as many bottles as you can fit in your car. It’s worth leaving behind bulky toys like footballs for kids if it means you can bring more water. The other thing is that in the middle of the desert your mobile may not have good signal, or indeed any signal at all, so you really would be stuck if your battery ran down. And sometimes batteries run down really fast in the heat so even if you charge you mobile fully before leaving the house you might find it almost drained by the time you arrive at your camping spot. So get a car charger. Also, the best preparation is to never plan a trip alone. By alone, I mean with only one car. You should always go in a group of at least 2 cars, and preferably more. It’s just much safer.

    I: Yes, well that certainly makes sense. And what about special equipment? What did you need to take with you?

    C: Right. Well, you need a 4-by-4, obviously, so that’s a big car that can accelerate with all four wheels - like a jeep or a Pajero. When you leave the main roads you have to let down your car tyres before you start driving on the sand. Otherwise you’d just sink if they were still pumped up with air. And then inside the car you need equipment for towing. So a strong rope that can be fixed to the front of back of any vehicle that gets stuck in the sand and then attached to another car that can pull it free. It’s hard work to free a car that’s stuck in the sand so try not to get stuck!

    I: Right, well that was very interesting, Carla. Thanks for all the tips. I might try it myself one day.

Answer Sheet
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
N/A
13
N/A
14
N/A
15
N/A
16
N/A
17
N/A
18
N/A
19
N/A
20
N/A
21
N/A
22
N/A
23
N/A
24
N/A
25
N/A
26
N/A
27
N/A
28
N/A
29
N/A
30
N/A
31
N/A
32
N/A
33
N/A
34
N/A
35
N/A
36
N/A
37
N/A
38
N/A
39
N/A
40
N/A
 
Listening Script Vocabulary

(Section 2: You will hear a radio presenter interviewing a woman about her experiences of desert camping. First, you will have some time to look at questions 11 to 21 [20 seconds]. Listen carefully and answer questions 11 to 21.)

I = INTERVIEWER

C = Carla

I: Hello Listeners. Today I have Carla Lambert in the studio talking about her experiences of desert camping. Carla lived in Dubai for 5 years and took many short trips into the desert with friends and family. As you probably know, temperatures in the desert get pretty high – up to 50 degrees Celsius in the height of summer – so Carla is going to give us some survival tips about how to make a success of a trip in such a harsh climate.  Carla, what are your tips for desert camping?

C: Well. Obviously, it’s not recommended to go in the summer months because, as you said, the temperatures are so high from May to August. November to March are lovely months for camping. The temperatures are quite cool for the region then although it does also get quite cold at night and you definitely need to bring extra blankets to sleep in. My number one tip is always to tell someone at home where you’re going and when you’ll be back. That way, they will look out for your return and raise the alarm if you don’t arrive when you said you would.

I: Right. And can you explain a bit more about the dangers of desert camping.

C: Sure. Well, the main danger, I suppose, is the harsh climate because if your vehicle overheats in the sun or your car’s air conditioning breaks down it would really be quite dangerous to have no shelter.

I: Right. And do the vehicles get damaged?

C: Mmm, well, they can do if you’re reckless. I mean, part of the fun of desert camping is the dune bashing. So, dune bashing is when you drive your vehicle over the sand dunes. Some of them are really high so it can be quite scary for beginners. And also dangerous, of course, because the car can topple over if you aren’t an experienced driver or it you’re simply not paying attention. If you’re careful, though, it’s perfectly safe. But most of all it’s great fun to drive over the dunes up and down, a real adrenaline rush.

I: I see. And what kind of preparations do you have to make before going on a desert camping trip?

C: Well, you don’t want to run out of water so stock up before you leave the city. Bring as many bottles as you can fit in your car. It’s worth leaving behind bulky toys like footballs for kids if it means you can bring more water. The other thing is that in the middle of the desert your mobile may not have good signal, or indeed any signal at all, so you really would be stuck if your battery ran down. And sometimes batteries run down really fast in the heat so even if you charge you mobile fully before leaving the house you might find it almost drained by the time you arrive at your camping spot. So get a car charger. Also, the best preparation is to never plan a trip alone. By alone, I mean with only one car. You should always go in a group of at least 2 cars, and preferably more. It’s just much safer.

I: Yes, well that certainly makes sense. And what about special equipment? What did you need to take with you?

C: Right. Well, you need a 4-by-4, obviously, so that’s a big car that can accelerate with all four wheels - like a jeep or a Pajero. When you leave the main roads you have to let down your car tyres before you start driving on the sand. Otherwise you’d just sink if they were still pumped up with air. And then inside the car you need equipment for towing. So a strong rope that can be fixed to the front of back of any vehicle that gets stuck in the sand and then attached to another car that can pull it free. It’s hard work to free a car that’s stuck in the sand so try not to get stuck!

I: Right, well that was very interesting, Carla. Thanks for all the tips. I might try it myself one day.

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